Gorilla spends final moments hugging man who rescued her as baby

It’s always a special day when an animal gives birth to newborns, especially when it’s twins — bringing two baby animals into the world at once.

For many species, though, giving birth to twins is quite rare, which makes it even more remarkable when they do.

That’s why one zoo is celebrating the birth of “miracle twin” baby Asian elephants, an extraordinarily rare occurrence for the species.

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The Rosamond Gifford Zoo, in Syracuse, New York, recently announced that Asian elephants Mali and Doc gave birth to a pair of male elephant twins on October 24.

It’s remarkable because less than 1% of elephant births worldwide are twins, and when it does happen the babies are often stillborn, and sometimes the mother doesn’t even survive.

But thankfully, that wasn’t the case here: both the twins and mom Mali are doing well, with the zoo reporting “no complications.”

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According to a press release, the first born calf arrived “perfectly healthy” and weighed 220 pounds. The second newborn arrived 10 hours later and was “noticeably weaker,” but thanks to vets on hand his condition has significantly improved. He weighs 237 pounds.

The arrival of the second twin reportedly left staff “astonished” due to the rarity, but the staff was prepared for any situation and worked to keep the newborns healthy.

“I can’t commend my team enough for all they have done these past few weeks to ensure the care and safety of Mali and her twins,” said Zoo Director Ted Fox. “It has been incredible to watch them in action and witness the high level of expertise, professionalism and focus under pressure.”

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It’s also great news because the Asian elephant is an endangered species, with fewer than 20,000 left in the wild, threatened by illegal poaching and habitat loss.

The birth of not one but two elephants will go a long way in ensuring their future survival.

“This is truly an historic moment for the zoo and our community. I couldn’t be prouder of our exceptional animal care team, the support of the veterinary staff and their tremendous dedication to Mali and the twins,” said County Executive Ryan J. McMahon.

“The important research happening right here at the zoo will have a significant impact worldwide on behalf of this magnificent endangered species.”

Read more at Animal World category

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